Field Trip: Eating My Way Around Boston (Part Deux)

December 9, 2014 § 2 Comments

Where were we? Oh right, leaving Boston’s North End after touring and tasting. (Need a refresher? Missed the first part of Eating My Way Around Boston? Catch up here.) With stops for oysters, a lobster roll, and cannoli checked off my list, I followed Hanover Street west — out of the North End — over to Congress Street, and into the heart of downtown Boston.

If you’re a history geek, there are plenty of interesting historical sites to visit along this part of the Freedom Trail, including the site of the Boston Massacre, the Old South Meeting House, and Granary Burial Ground (final resting place of Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and Paul Revere, among others). Walking through the contemporary City Plaza, then along historic Tremont Street with its old churches and burial grounds was a bit of a cognitive disconnect. History — not just the history of Boston or Massachusetts, but the history of this nation — lives side-by-side with 21st-century life. Our history in the Bay Area is newer, different, and not as much about the birth and infancy of a nation, but more about the growth of one. Something to ponder while watching the world go by from a bench in Boston Common (which, by the way, is the country’s oldest public park).

As I mentioned in my previous post, it wasn’t the prettiest day for touring, but Boston Common is one of those city parks that is lovely any time of year. It’s a large, beautiful green space with much to explore, including a variety of commemorative statues, a Frog Pond, and a large lagoon with swan boats. Or, just find a bench in a tree-shaded location and people watch for a while.

Beacon Hill, my final tour stop of the day, was a short walk across busy Beacon Street to Charles Street. With its old-growth trees, picture-perfect side streets, and neat red-brick buildings, I’d found my quintessential Boston calendar page. I spent a leisurely hour or so crisscrossing the neighborhood, checking out the cute shops and cafés. With the afternoon (and daylight) waning, it was time to head over to Fort Point for snacks and happy hour.

Snackalicious
Planning ahead for something tasty and sweet to snack on later in the evening, I stopped into Flour Bakery in Fort Point. With a mouth-watering assortment of French-style pastries and American baked goods (from beautiful petite tarts to hefty, rich brownies), it was a sugar-rush paradise. Flour also bakes a variety of breads and rolls, as well as some savory pastries. In the “but wait, there’s more category,” they also serve breakfast, salads, and sandwiches daily — either fresh-made to eat in or packaged to go.

Showing some amazing restraint, I limited myself to a cornmeal lime sandwich cookie the size of my palm, filled with lime buttercream. Fortunately I had another stop on my food tour, which would distract me from the cookie for the time being (although I could swear was calling my name from inside my purse).

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Cornmeal-lime sandwich cookie from Flour Bakery in Fort Point

It’s 5 o’Clock Somewhere
After a full day of seeing Boston on foot, I figured I had earned my happy hour, so I found my way to craft bar Drink in Fort Point. Actually, not realizing that Drink is below street level, I walked right by entrance and had to circle back. (Hint: Drink and Sportello Restaurant share the same entrance. Go upstairs for Sportello and downstairs for Drink.) The interior is classic loft-style (San Franciscans, you’d feel right at home): brick walls, street-level windows, sleek wood bartops, open-beam ceiling, and low-wattage Edison lightbulbs.

Drink’s concept is interesting: you tell your bartender what you like to drink — whether that’s a particular cocktail, alcohol, or flavor — and he’ll whip up a libation just for you from the house’s extensive catalogue of handcrafted drinks. Just so you know, that catalogue is mostly in the bartenders’ heads. That’s right, there are no drink menus. Your drink is crafted based your preferences and your bartender’s extensive knowledge of Drink’s cocktails. It’s a marriage of prohibition-era cocktail culture with contemporary creativity.

When I mentioned to my bartender, Joe, that I’d developed a taste for vodka martinis lately, he suggested A Means of Preservation. Although the drink is typically gin-based, Joe offered me a selection of vodkas, including San Francisco’s own Hangar 1, as the cocktail’s main ingredient. A Means of Preservation (for me) is: Hangar 1 Vodka, St. Germain Liqueur, Dolin Extra Dry Vermouth, celery bitters, and a grapefruit twist, served up in a coupe glass.

A Means of Preservation at Drink

A Means of Preservation at Drink

This cocktail is light and elegant with layers of citrus and botanicals; it’s the perfect aperitif to sip while perusing Drink’s food menu. Like the cocktail choices, Drink’s food is a combination of classic and contemporary: Chicago Style Hot Dog, Grilled Cheese with squash, cheddar and sage, and House Made Charcuterie are just a few of the dozen options on the menu. The standout item for me? Vegetarian Charcuterie. Before you start envisioning a plate of chopped up vegetables, let me tell you that this was one of the more interesting vegetarian dishes I’ve had in a long time.

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L to R: Carrot rillettes with butter and sea salt; beet tartare with curry and pepper; creamy, earthy mushroom mousse; smoked yam slices with olive oil and smoked sea salt; house-made chips

Served on a cutting board, the Vegetarian Charcuterie includes four individual vegetarian dishes — carrot rillettes, mushroom mousse, beet tartare, and smoked yams — accompanied by house-made potato chips (or request bread, if you prefer). Every dish was flavorful and satisfying, from the first bite of buttery carrot rillettes to the last piece of smoked yam, accented with olive oil and sea salt. While I enjoyed everything on the board, the mushroom mousse was my favorite. I loved the contrast of the light, creamy texture of the mousse with the earthy, slightly spicy mushroom flavor. Second favorite was the beet tartare, spiced with curry and a touch of pepper, topped with a dollop of sour cream.

I had planned to hit Legal Seafood for dinner, but after a full day of tasting and touring, I was ready to head back to the hotel and climb into bed (call the water taxi!). Sorry Legal Seafood… next time. I ended my day savoring Flour’s cornmeal-lime sandwich cookie while enjoying the panoramic view of Boston’s city lights from my room. Sleep well? You bet I did.

How would you spend 24 hours in Boston? What’s your perfect day?

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